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Missouri Parent Immigration Lawyers

Immigration Help - Green Card for Parents in Missouri

Have you just realized your parents might need the green card to be by your side? A sudden realization can spell inconvenience. Everything will be so much easier if they’re with you. 

You’d feel more motivated, educated, and secure when they’re there to lend you a helping hand – emotionally and financially.

It’s time to get help from an experienced immigration lawyer – one that can put a light in your heart and a smile on your face.

At Gateway Immigration Law Firm, we have years of experience helping people through difficult times with their visas or green cards. Our experienced parent immigration lawyers know what to do and how to navigate these complex immigration procedures to provide the best results for our clients.

How does Green Card for parents work?

green card for parentsGreen Card for Parents is an immigration program that allows parents of U.S. citizens or permanent residents to work and live permanently in the United States.

In a persuasive tone: The biggest advantage of applying for a green card for parents is that once they have permanent residence in the United States, they can work anywhere in the country. There are no restrictions on them. Once you have your parents with you, it becomes easier to take care of them, and you do not have to spend your hard-earned cash on their living expenses.

Can I bring my parents to the U.S. permanently?

Once you’re at least 21 years old and a citizen of the United States, you can acquire a Green Card for your parents. Green Card is an immigrant visa that enables the parents of U.S. citizens to legally and permanently live in the United States. There is no annual limit on the issuance of Green Cards for parents.

What documents are needed to apply for a green card for parents?

For anyone applying for a green card, gathering documentation is one of the most important steps to know. To apply for a green card, you’ll need to submit some documents to your local U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) office and others to USCIS’ central service center.The first step in applying for a green card is filing the I-130 Petition for Alien Relative. This will establish your eligibility to be sponsored by your parents to immigrate to the U.S. as an immigrant visa beneficiary. It will also begin the immigration paperwork and evidence gathering that you’ll need to prove your relationship. The data below outlines petitioning steps based on your situation.

If you are a U.S. citizen over the age of 21 and your: 

  •  Father doesn’t live in the U.S. You must therefore submit
  • Form I-130
  • A copy of your birth certificate that lists your name and the names of both of your parents
  • If you weren’t born in the U.S., a copy of your Certificate of Naturalization, citizenship, or U.S. passport.
  • A copy of the civil marriage certificate of your parents
  • Mother lives outside the United States. You must therefore submit
  • Form I-130
  • A copy of your birth certificate containing your name and your mother’s name.
  • If you were not born in the United States, a copy of your Certificate of Naturalization or U.S. passport.

  • Father lives outside of the U.S., and you were born out of wedlock and weren’t “legitimized” by him before you turned 18. You must therefore submit
  • Form I-130
  • A copy of your birth certificate that lists both your name and the name of your father
  • If you were not born in the United States, a copy of your Certificate of Naturalization, citizenship, or U.S. passport
  • Proof that you and your father had an emotional or financial connection before you married or turned 21, whichever one came first.
  • Father resides outside of the United States, and you were born out of wedlock and legitimated by your father before your 18th birthday. You must therefore submit
  • Form I-130
  • A copy of your birth certificate that lists both your name and the name of your father
  • If you were not born in the United States., a copy of your Certificate of Naturalization, citizenship, or U.S. passport
  • Proof that you were legitimated before your 18th birthday through the marriage of your natural parents, the regulations of your country or state (of birth or residence), or the laws of your father’s country or state (of birth or residence)
  • A petition is filed to bring your adoptive parent to live in the United States. You must therefore submit
  • Form I-130
  • Birth certificate copy
  • If you were not born in the United States, bring your naturalization or citizenship certificate
  • A true certified copy of the adoption certificate demonstrating that you were adopted prior to your 16th birthday
  • A statement detailing the dates and locations where you lived with your parents.
  • A petition to bring your stepparent to the United States has been filed. You must therefore submit
  • Form I-130
  • A copy of your birth certificate listing your birth parents’ names.
  • A copy of your birth parent’s civil marriage certificate to your stepparent indicating that the marriage happened before your 18th birthday
  • A copy of any annulment decrees, divorce decrees, or death certificates proving that your natural or step-previous parent’s marriages ended legally
Note: If your or your parent’s name has changed, include legal documentation (court judgment of name change, divorce decree, marriage certificate, adoption decree, etc.)Learn More: Learn your Basics on Applying for a Green Card

Does green cards have limits?

This status is not completely secure. For example, you can lose your right to a green card if you:

  • Commit a crime.
  • Don’t live in the U.S. as your main home.
  • Forget to tell the immigration authorities about a change of address.
  • Get involved in terrorist or subversive activities, or break any other immigration law.

How long does it take to get a U.S. green card for parents?

Most of the time, it takes 10 to 13 months for parents of U.S. citizens. Like with spouses of U.S. citizens, there is no cap on how many green cards can be issued. So, if you have a citizen parent, you can usually get a green card within a year.

How long does it take to petition the parents of U.S. citizens?

The time it takes to process your I-130 petition will depend on how close you are to the family member and which USCIS field office gets your form. Processing times for Form I-130 vary between 5 and 30 months for immediate relatives (spouse or unmarried child) of a U.S. green card holder (legal permanent resident) (as of June 2022).

For a U.S. citizen’s spouse, unmarried child under 21, or parent, the wait time for Form I-130 is between 5 and 14.5 months (as of June 2022). You should start your I-130 application as soon as possible.

Important Note: Filing Form I-130 is the first step to getting a parent a green card. When Form I-130 is approved, Permanent residence status isn’t granted (green card). It’s simply the U.S. government recognizing a valid relationship.

What are some of the problems in obtaining a Green Card for Your Parents?

Parents of U.S. citizens do not have to wait in line to come to the U.S. like some other family green card cases do. When their child turns 21, parents of U.S. citizens can apply for a “green card.” But there are usually a few problems that come up in parental green card cases that could make the application get turned down. 

First, both the parent and the child must prove to U.S. immigration or U.S. consular officials that they are related. Some families have to do DNA tests to determine who the parents are. When adopted children or stepchildren want a green card for their parents, they run into other problems because special rules apply to these situations. 

Another common problem in green card for parents cases is the applicant’s ability to show that the parent won’t be a financial or health burden on the public. This is particularly true for older or elderly parents.

For Help With Green Card For Parents, Speak To A Missouri Parent Immigration Attorney Today

The green card process can be confusing and daunting, especially if you are trying to navigate it on your own. This is why it is important to speak with an experienced immigration attorney as soon as possible after filing your I-130 petition. The task may seem large and intimidating, but it can be much less stressful when you have knowledgeable legal counsel guiding you through the process. 

If you’re considering filing for a parent green card, make sure to contact our firm today. We’d love to start working on your case and fight for your rights in the U.S. A consultation is free and comes with no obligation on your part.

Let our immigration attorneys help you!

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